Lip-Tie

A lip-tie is a tight or short triangular band of tissue connecting the upper lip to the gingiva (gum).  It’s also referred to as the upper labial (maxillary) frenulum.  All babies have some degree of tissue present.  There is are very few studies on how lip-ties affect breastfeeding; we are unsure how or if they affect latching. Concern also exists that a lip-tie can cause…

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Tongue-Tie

Tongue-tie (or ankyloglossia) exists when the tongue is limited in its function due to the presence of a restrictive band under the tongue called a frenulum. The presence of a frenulum doesn’t not alone indicate a tongue-tie; if the frenulum is short, thick and restricts movement it can affect feeding and is referred to a tongue-tie. Ankyloglossia affects 5-10% of babies. We are passionate about…

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VPI and Hypernasal

When a child has a cold or stuffy nose, their speech can be affected and it can sound very “nasal-y.” Some parents experience this type of speech on a daily basis with their child. Children suffering from a form of speech impairment known as VPI, or velopharyngeal insufficiency, speak with this nasal-like and muffled tone/hypernasality constantly. It occurs when there is not enough soft tissue…

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Pediatric Breast Conditions

Breast issues in children may seem like an oddity, but they are actually quite common, in both boys and girls. One of the most frequent pediatric breast conditions we see is breast asymmetry, where one breast is larger than the other. The difference in size can be due to certain underlying conditions, trauma experienced to the chest or breast bud area hindering growth and development,…

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Scar Revisions

At times, scars are considered badges of honor–reminders of an exciting adventure, or a sign that you beat the odds to overcome something like a traumatic injury or serious illness. Other times, a permanent scar is not so celebrated. The scars in this category can draw unwelcome attention and become a source of self-consciousness. Such scars can change the shape of a facial feature, cause physical…

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Congenital Hand Differences

A simple handshake can be a physically and emotionally challenging task for someone born with a congenital hand difference.  Our goal at Wellspring Craniofacial Group is to tend to both challenges.  Surprisingly common, hand differences affect 1 out of every 20 babies and can impact both the shape and function of a child’s hand.  These types of issues develop while a baby is still in the womb. …

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Gynecomastia

Gynecomastia occurs in adolescent boys when there is excess tissue growth in the chest area, leading to the appearance of female-like breasts. It is a common disorder of the endocrine system fueled by hormonal imbalances during puberty, and we see it in patients frequently at Wellspring Craniofacial. Most cases of gynecomastia resolve themselves after about two years as bodily proportions and hormonal fluctuations even out….

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Vascular Malformations

The second type of vascular birthmark is referred to as a vascular malformation.  The term “vascular malformation” refers to a collection of birthmarks. Generally speaking, the type of vascular tissue defines the type of birthmark: a proliferation of capillaries defines a capillary malformation, a proliferation of veins defines a venous malformation, a proliferation of lymphatic vessels defines a lymphatic malformation, and so on. Malformations include: Nevus…

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